It was heart-shattering to read what Taylor Fulks childhood was like. I wanted to commit murder as I read the book–people like the man she knew as her father do not deserve to live in my opinion–and I am not a violent person. Then to see how the results of what he did coloured the choices she made in her relationships after he was out of her life–the guilt, the self-loathing, the lack of confidence…the search for love in the wrong places. Until she reached the end of her endurance, and then drew only the only thing she had left–self-preservation-and began to look after Taylor.
Sadly this thing happens all the time–it could be your next door neighbour, your uncle, your pastor,a teacher, a politician. You never know what goes on in a household, but if you see dramatic changes in a child’s demeanour, each of us needs to be responsible and step out of our comfort zone. We need to say something about what we see to someone who can investigate, someone who can make a difference.

I think what I loved about her story was not the book, My Prison Without Walls, but Taylor Fulks own statement in the from the author where she wrote “My life is what it is. My experiences happened in the past. I don’t live there anymore. I can choose to be angry and ashamed for the rest of my life, or I can accept my life for what it’s been, what it is now, and move toward the light…and who knows, maybe help someone else along the way. Hence, my mission statement: The rest of my life will be the best of my life. It’s not about my destination…it’s about the journey that gets me there.”

Kudo’s to her–what a remarkable woman she has become, what strength of character she has developed. People can rise above these tragedies if they dig deep and make a decision to do so. I only know her from the book, but I am soooo full of admiration for her!

This book can be purchased at Amazon.com by clicking here.